Time Magazine on The Case Against Homework: “What could be more welcome”

The Case Against Homework and Alfie Kohn’s, The Homework Myth, are the subject of an article in this week’s Time magazine. The author, Claudia Wallis, writes:

Sachem was the last straw. Or was it Kiva? My 12-year-old daughter and I had been drilling social-studies key words for more than an hour. It was 11 p.m. Our entire evening had, as usual, consisted of homework and conversations (a.k.a. nagging) about homework. She was tired and fed up. I was tired and fed up. The words wouldn’t stick. They meant nothing to her. They didn’t mean much to me either. After all, when have I ever used sachem in a sentence–until just now?

As the summer winds down, I’m dreading scenes like that one from seventh grade. Already the carefree August nights have given way to meaningful conversations (a.k.a. nagging) about the summer reading that didn’t get done. So what could be more welcome than two new books assailing this bane of modern family life: The Homework Myth (Da Capo Press; 243 pages), by Alfie Kohn, the prolific, perpetual critic of today’s test-driven schools, and The Case Against Homework (Crown; 290 pages), a cri de coeur by two moms, lawyer Sara Bennett and journalist Nancy Kalish.”

Read the rest here: The Myth About Homework: Think hours of slogging are helping your child make the grade? Think again.

Leave a comment on “Time Magazine on The Case Against Homework: “What could be more welcome””

Your Info (optional)




Comment (required)

Message